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Nutrition Essentials: Faltering Growth Animated Video

Faltering growth refers to a reduction in weight-for-age over a period of time, often indicative of underlying issues. It can be caused by disease-related factors such as decreased intake, increased nutritional requirements, or excessive losses, as well as non-disease-related factors like psychosocial and environmental influences. Chronic diseases like congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and inflammatory bowel disease commonly contribute to disease-related FG. Hospitalized children, particularly those in pediatric intensive care units, are at heightened risk of malnutrition. Short-term consequences of FG include impaired immune function and increased susceptibility to infections, while long-term impacts may include reduced cognitive development and increased risk of obesity. FG also poses a significant financial burden on healthcare systems, with prolonged hospital stays and higher medical costs associated with undernourished children. Nutritional management of FG requires a detailed understanding of the underlying conditions, and international guidelines provide recommendations for optimal management. Key considerations include ensuring appropriate intake of energy, protein, and micronutrients, as well as the use of prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to support immune function and cognitive development. The booklet emphasizes the importance of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of FG, as well as the need for a multidisciplinary approach to nutritional support. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and management of FG and to implement effective interventions, especially in underprivileged populations.

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Managing undernutrition in pediatric intensive care units

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Nutrition Essentials: Faltering Growth Animated Video

Faltering growth refers to a reduction in weight-for-age over a period of time, often indicative of underlying issues. It can be caused by disease-related factors such as decreased intake, increased nutritional requirements, or excessive losses, as well as non-disease-related factors like psychosocial and environmental influences. Chronic diseases like congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and inflammatory bowel disease commonly contribute to disease-related FG. Hospitalized children, particularly those in pediatric intensive care units, are at heightened risk of malnutrition. Short-term consequences of FG include impaired immune function and increased susceptibility to infections, while long-term impacts may include reduced cognitive development and increased risk of obesity. FG also poses a significant financial burden on healthcare systems, with prolonged hospital stays and higher medical costs associated with undernourished children. Nutritional management of FG requires a detailed understanding of the underlying conditions, and international guidelines provide recommendations for optimal management. Key considerations include ensuring appropriate intake of energy, protein, and micronutrients, as well as the use of prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to support immune function and cognitive development. The booklet emphasizes the importance of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of FG, as well as the need for a multidisciplinary approach to nutritional support. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and management of FG and to implement effective interventions, especially in underprivileged populations.

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The animated video "Managing undernutrition in pediatric intensive care units" examines the issue of malnutrition among children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) globally. Highlighting a study from 2011 to 2019 with 8,725 PICU admissions, it reveals that 20% of these children are malnourished, leading to longer hospital stays, increased health risks, and higher care costs—including an extra $100,000 per hospitalization for malnourished children compared to those who are not undernourished.

The video outlines a proactive strategy: implementing a simple malnutrition screening tool in PICUs to identify malnourished patients early and provide timely nutritional support. Such an intervention could significantly reduce hospital length of stay and healthcare costs. The video advocates for the early detection and prevention of malnutrition, highlights the critical role of timely nutritional support in the PICU, and underscores the implementation of a screening tool to improve outcomes for critically ill children worldwide.

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Nutrition Essentials: Faltering Growth Animated Video

Faltering growth refers to a reduction in weight-for-age over a period of time, often indicative of underlying issues. It can be caused by disease-related factors such as decreased intake, increased nutritional requirements, or excessive losses, as well as non-disease-related factors like psychosocial and environmental influences. Chronic diseases like congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and inflammatory bowel disease commonly contribute to disease-related FG. Hospitalized children, particularly those in pediatric intensive care units, are at heightened risk of malnutrition. Short-term consequences of FG include impaired immune function and increased susceptibility to infections, while long-term impacts may include reduced cognitive development and increased risk of obesity. FG also poses a significant financial burden on healthcare systems, with prolonged hospital stays and higher medical costs associated with undernourished children. Nutritional management of FG requires a detailed understanding of the underlying conditions, and international guidelines provide recommendations for optimal management. Key considerations include ensuring appropriate intake of energy, protein, and micronutrients, as well as the use of prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to support immune function and cognitive development. The booklet emphasizes the importance of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of FG, as well as the need for a multidisciplinary approach to nutritional support. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and management of FG and to implement effective interventions, especially in underprivileged populations.

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Nutrition Essentials: Faltering Growth Animated Video

Faltering growth refers to a reduction in weight-for-age over a period of time, often indicative of underlying issues. It can be caused by disease-related factors such as decreased intake, increased nutritional requirements, or excessive losses, as well as non-disease-related factors like psychosocial and environmental influences. Chronic diseases like congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and inflammatory bowel disease commonly contribute to disease-related FG. Hospitalized children, particularly those in pediatric intensive care units, are at heightened risk of malnutrition. Short-term consequences of FG include impaired immune function and increased susceptibility to infections, while long-term impacts may include reduced cognitive development and increased risk of obesity. FG also poses a significant financial burden on healthcare systems, with prolonged hospital stays and higher medical costs associated with undernourished children. Nutritional management of FG requires a detailed understanding of the underlying conditions, and international guidelines provide recommendations for optimal management. Key considerations include ensuring appropriate intake of energy, protein, and micronutrients, as well as the use of prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to support immune function and cognitive development. The booklet emphasizes the importance of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of FG, as well as the need for a multidisciplinary approach to nutritional support. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and management of FG and to implement effective interventions, especially in underprivileged populations.

Nutrition Essentials: Faltering Growth Animated Video

Faltering growth refers to a reduction in weight-for-age over a period of time, often indicative of underlying issues. It can be caused by disease-related factors such as decreased intake, increased nutritional requirements, or excessive losses, as well as non-disease-related factors like psychosocial and environmental influences. Chronic diseases like congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and inflammatory bowel disease commonly contribute to disease-related FG. Hospitalized children, particularly those in pediatric intensive care units, are at heightened risk of malnutrition. Short-term consequences of FG include impaired immune function and increased susceptibility to infections, while long-term impacts may include reduced cognitive development and increased risk of obesity. FG also poses a significant financial burden on healthcare systems, with prolonged hospital stays and higher medical costs associated with undernourished children. Nutritional management of FG requires a detailed understanding of the underlying conditions, and international guidelines provide recommendations for optimal management. Key considerations include ensuring appropriate intake of energy, protein, and micronutrients, as well as the use of prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to support immune function and cognitive development. The booklet emphasizes the importance of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of FG, as well as the need for a multidisciplinary approach to nutritional support. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and management of FG and to implement effective interventions, especially in underprivileged populations.

Nutrition Essentials: Faltering Growth Animated Video

Faltering growth refers to a reduction in weight-for-age over a period of time, often indicative of underlying issues. It can be caused by disease-related factors such as decreased intake, increased nutritional requirements, or excessive losses, as well as non-disease-related factors like psychosocial and environmental influences. Chronic diseases like congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and inflammatory bowel disease commonly contribute to disease-related FG. Hospitalized children, particularly those in pediatric intensive care units, are at heightened risk of malnutrition. Short-term consequences of FG include impaired immune function and increased susceptibility to infections, while long-term impacts may include reduced cognitive development and increased risk of obesity. FG also poses a significant financial burden on healthcare systems, with prolonged hospital stays and higher medical costs associated with undernourished children. Nutritional management of FG requires a detailed understanding of the underlying conditions, and international guidelines provide recommendations for optimal management. Key considerations include ensuring appropriate intake of energy, protein, and micronutrients, as well as the use of prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to support immune function and cognitive development. The booklet emphasizes the importance of screening, assessment, and diagnosis of FG, as well as the need for a multidisciplinary approach to nutritional support. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and management of FG and to implement effective interventions, especially in underprivileged populations.

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